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Rosemary's Baby

(Rated MA15+)

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"This is not a dream, this is really happening"

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Overview

Rightly considered a horror classic, Rosemary's Baby, adapted from the novel by Ira Levin (The Stepford Wives) remains just as chilling four and a half decades on. Mia Farrow plays Rosemary, a good Catholic girl from a big family who has moved to New York City and fallen in love with up-and-coming actor Guy (John Cassavetes). The newlyweds move into an imposing building called The Bramford, despite grave warnings from Rosemary's older friend Hutch (Maurice Evans). Strange things begin to happen as Guy's career starts to rise after meeting and befriending their new next-door neighbours – eccentric older couple Minnie and Roman Castavet (Ruth Gordon and Sidney Blackman in their iconic roles) and soon Rosemary finds herself pregnant and, er, not feeling too well, actually...

Why You Should See This Film

The film won a slew of awards upon its initial release, including a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for Ruth Gordon, and still frequently tops Best Horror Film lists. Its themes of witchcraft and satanic worship began a trend in films and books, setting off an occult explosion in pop culture. There's so much trivia surrounding the film too, not least the use of the Dakota Building (home to John & Yoko, Laine Cummings and filmmaker Albert Maysles) as The Bramford. The cast are all excellent and so are the sets – bleeding late ‘60s colours and patterns into some pretty dark themes – topped off with a perfectly chilling score by Krzysztof Komeda and an instantly recognisable pixie cut on Mia Farrow.

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  • Year: 1968
  • Rating: MA15+
  • Director: Roman Polanski
  • Cast: Ruth Gordon, Mia Farrow, John Cassavetes
  • Duration: 136 minutes
  • Language: English
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