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Human Flow

(Rated M)

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"When there is nowhere to go, nowhere is home."

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Overview

From exiled activist and art celebrity Ai Weiwei, Human Flow is a vivid examination of the global refugee crisis, the greatest human displacement since World War II. Filmed across 23 countries over the course of one year, this documentary charts a surprisingly personal journey from overflowing migration camps to perilous ocean crossings and barricaded borders. Weiwei’s camera bears witness to the urgent desperation and endurance of individuals affected by famine, climate change and war, calling for the global community to choose compassion and respect over fear and self-interest. As ever, Weiwei is not preoccupied with easy answers and instead is determined to engage the subjects of migration and human tragedy on relatable terms.

Why You Should See This Film

Moving across Afghanistan, Bangladesh, France, Greece, Germany, Iraq, Israel, Italy, Kenya, Mexico and Turkey, Ai Weiwei's camera hovers above the crisis and renders it simultaneously grand and intimate. From massive crowds awaiting deportation and sudden roadside explosions to displaced children playing in tents and small boats on swelling oceans — nothing escapes his watchful and empathetic eye.

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Session Times

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  • Year: 2017
  • Rating: M
  • Director: Ai Weiwei
  • Cast: Israa Abboud, Hiba Abed, Rami Abu Sondos
  • Duration: 140 minutes
  • Language: English
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